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Los Alamos Branch Of AAUW Meets Nov. 7

first_imgAAUW News: New Mexico Commissioner for Public Lands Stephanie Garcia Richard will present a talk on the challenges and opportunities she faces as land commissioner. The meeting is open to the public.center_img The Los Alamos Branch of the American Association of University Women is having its fall meeting 7:15-9 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 7 at White Rock Branch Library on Longview Drive and N.M. 4. last_img

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One for the roads

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Hankook Tire America Announces New Southeast U.S. Sales Regional Director

first_img“Michael brings a wealth of tire industry knowledge and experience with him to Hankook,” said Shawn Denlein, senior vice president of sales, Hankook Tire America Corp. “His addition to Hankook’s sales team will allow us to further our dedication to our dealer partners in the Southeast and continue our positive growth in the United States.” LSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement Perkins has approximately 27 years of experience in the tire industry, from both a manufacturer and dealer/retailer position, having previously been employed by Reliable Tire Co., K&M Tire Inc. and Bridgestone/Firestone. DeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business.  DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain. With more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  WAYNE, N.J. – Hankook Tire America Corp. has named Michael Perkins its new regional director of sales for the Southeastern United States. Perkins will oversee Hankook’s sales operations for its Southeast region, which includes Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia. Perkins will be based at Hankook Tire America Corp.’s Southeast regional office located in Atlanta, Ga.  AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement,Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementlast_img read more

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Self-Pity Doesn’t Have A Leg To Stand On

first_imgRyan feared a Russian spy had poisoned him.He awakened one weird morning in March with all the aches, pains, and groans he had always heard came with those years after turning 60. But he had been so cocksure he would stave off the ailments that his friends had: heart problems, chronic back pain, scoliosis, lupus, bursitis, pulmonary problems, and liver problems.Except for an enlarged prostate that occasionally made him get up in the night, and hay fever, Ryan was actually in pretty good health. Sure, he was 20 pounds over what the charts designed for kale-fed hipsters said he should weigh. But he went to the gym four times a week, doing 20 minutes on the stationary bike, and grunting at six resistance machines.He liked to walk, often bounding upstairs rather than riding an escalator.Ryan only ate red meat once a year, usually a steak at a top shelf place like Bobby Van’s. He lived on fish, poultry, pasta, pizza, and vegetables.He gave up smoking 30 years ago. He hung up his tankard three years later. He played the Lottery when it occurred to him, but otherwise didn’t gamble so he didn’t take regular beatings from bookies or have limbs broken by impatient loan sharks.Without alcohol, tobacco, or gambling as vices, he indulged in sweets to feed his Celtic guilt.Ryan had his gall bladder removed and kidney stones excised. He’d had a ventricle tachycardia about 20 years ago for which doctors were never able to find a cause.It was a one off.His various chest X-rays, colonoscopies, and MRIs had given him a clean bill of health.So, Ryan was coasting through his 60s like a guy 10 years his junior.That was, until that morning in March when he tried to push himself up in bed and felt sudden pain in his wrists and elbows. Not screaming pain. But a low-groaning, what-the-hell-is-wrong-with-me pain at the joints, like he’d been bitten by a rattler.Ryan fell back on his pillow and tried to swing out of bed, legs first.“What’s wrong with my knees?” he shouted.There were probably a few words beginning with the letter F scattered in the question. Behind his knees raged a flaring pain that worsened when he tried to bend them. He got to a sitting position and tried to stand.That’s when the ankles wobbled like a newbie on water skis in Long Island Sound.Wrists, elbows, knees, and ankles.He plopped back on his bed. He didn’t need to Google those four words to know they added up to one word: Arthritis.He had a brother with arthritis but he first suffered it in his 40s, almost certainly linked to Agent Orange his US Army unit was exposed to in great abundance in Vietnam.He Googled it anyway.He had all the symptoms, except the online sites said it usually comes on gradually. Ryan’s ailments came on about as gradually as a Mike Tyson left hook.He hobbled to the medicine chest, gobbling three naproxen tablets. The pain started subsiding in about 20 minutes. Not completely, but enough to function.He spoke to his doctor, who said it sounded like sudden onset of osteoarthritis. “What do I do about it?”“Grin and bear it.”“Does it get better?” Ryan asked.“No, worse. As you age.”“So, this is my body saying the warranty is wearing out?”“Good way to put it. Come in next week. But I won’t prescribe opioids for that.”“I don’t want opioids. I want to be like I was yesterday.”“Don’t we all. Keep going to the gym. That will help. Lots of water. Less salt and sugar.”Ryan called his arthritic brother, who said he takes a turmeric pill twice a day to help him with his arthritis. Ryan took two naproxen every four hours and a turmeric morning and night.It helped.Until four days later, when Ryan drove round trip from Southampton to Manhattan on business.That night when he took off his sneakers, his feet and ankles had swollen like Macy floats. When he described this to his doctor, he was warned it might be edema, which is exacerbated by ibuprofen or naproxen. “Elevate your feet, drink lots of water, stop using salt,” said Ryan’s doctor.And so, in his mid-60s, Ryan finally felt his age.Ryan felt sorry for himself for another hour. Then he looked at a smiling photo of his deceased father, an Irish immigrant who lost his leg to gangrene at age 24 and went on to marry and raise seven kids in a tenement on a factory worker’s wage.He got up every morning, strapped on his wooden leg, and went to work and never complained, unless there was no work.Ryan smiled at his old man who looked like he was laughing from the photo at his spoiled American kid with two good legs moaning about a few aches and pains.It made Ryan reread part of Woody Allen’s riff on aging: “In my next life, I want to live my life backwards. You start out dead and get that out of the way. Then you wake up in an old people’s home feeling better every day. You get kicked out for being too healthy . . .You work for 40 years until you’re young enough to enjoy your retirement. You party, drink alcohol, and are generally promiscuous, then you are ready for high school.”Ryan laughed again, took two Excedrin, and went to the gym on his own two feet.To comment on Sand in my Shoes, email denishamill@gmail.com. Sharelast_img read more

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Top News of the Week December 30, 2013 – January 4, 2014

first_imgCargo Ship in Distress Off Newfoundland CoastContainer ship MSC Monterey issued a distress call yesterday while sailing off the coast of Newfoundland, about 60 kilometers south of Portugal Cove South saying that the crew had discovered a crack in the hull, Joint Rescue Coordination Centre (JRCC) Halifax reported.Odfjell’s Rig Sunk and Lies on Seabed by Quay at DSME YardOn 28 December 2013, the semisubmersible rig “Deepsea Aberdeen”, currently under construction at Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering (DSME) in Korea, experienced water ingress on pontoon while moored at the yard’s quay.SOLAS, MARPOL Amendments Entered into Force on 1 January 2014A number of amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL) and the 1988 Load Lines Protocol entered into force or took effect from 1 January 2014.DSME Secures Incheon Class Frigate OrderDaewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering (DSME) announced on Monday that the company has won $305.8 million order to construct a frigate for the Korean Navy.BW Offshore Exercises Option to Acquire VLCC Blue OpalDaewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering (DSME) announced on Monday that the company has won $305.8 million order to construct a frigate for the Korean Navy.last_img read more

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Are we at saturation point with rights?

first_img Jonathan Goldsmith is secretary general of the Council of Bars and Law Societies of Europe, which represents about one million European lawyers through its member bars and law societies. Join our LinkedIn Human Rights sub-group the rights begin to clash more – take the cases we read about, involving religious symbols at work or in the courts, or the clash between free speech and privacy, or indeed the one I began with, between victims’ and defendants’ rights; the resolution of those conflicts leads to uncomfortable questions, already being discussed, as to who is responsible for resolving them – unelected judges who come from a narrow category of citizenry, or elected politicians who may be unwilling to resolve them, as in the case of the free speech/privacy clash; for some basic rights there are cheap tribunals established to resolve claims (for instance, welfare, employment, housing and immigration rights), but for the rest, if there are too many, they will become effectively unenforceable through being too expensive; and generally, if there is a glut of rights, they are devalued and begin to lose their very characteristic of basic rights, as with any other glut. He blogs weekly for the Gazette on European affairs.center_img The European Commission – or at any rate its justice arm – is big on rights. Justice commissioner Viviane Reding has recently published two important packages covering, first, suspects’ and defendants’ rights (the so-called Measure C, which will give the right to a lawyer anywhere in the EU from the first stage of police questioning), but also victims’ rights. Rights are a good thing, but interestingly, in this particular case they might clash. The Law Society has already responded to say that it is concerned that certain of the victims’ provisions ‘are inconsistent with the presumption of innocence and the right to a fair trial’. This leads me to reflect on where we are heading with rights in general. If I can give a potted, amateur history – please forgive me, academics who study this field in depth – we began to use the language of individual rights after the French Revolution (from 1789). There was Thomas Paine’s The Rights of Man (1791) and Mary Shelley’s A Vindication of the Rights of Women (1792). After that, basic rights were struggled over violently, and came very gradually. For instance, for something as basic as the right to vote, there was the Reform Act (1832), and then the granting of votes to women in 1918 and 1928. The right to a pension and unemployment benefit came in 1908-1911, and obviously other welfare rights, including the right to legal aid, in the immediate postwar period (1945-1951). Since then, rights have come thick and fast. It seems part of human nature that, once we have started down the road, there can be no end to the call for more rights. Just when you think that all possible rights have been satisfied – employment rights, ethnic minority rights, gay and lesbian rights, the right to die, animal rights – there are calls for more. My own political persuasion is to support this wholeheartedly. I favour more and more rights (and I realise that they fall in several different categories: economic, social, religious and so on). But does it end one day? And if so, where and how? We have been discovering that the financial aspect of rights is being eroded substantially and sometimes abandoned, because we can no longer afford them. The right to medical treatment free at the point of need; the right to retire on a good pension at 60 or 65; and of course, the one which concerns us directly, the right to legal aid – are being eroded and sometimes removed. As we know, this is likely to grow worse over the coming years. We are becoming poorer as a country. We also know that some rights are impossibly expensive to enforce, or are just unenforceable. The right to privacy – for those famous enough to need it – can only be enforced through expenditure of hundreds of thousands of pounds. Then technology comes along and undermines it anyway. But my question is: does society reach a point where it is saturated with rights and can take no more? Is there an optimal point where we can say ‘that is it, we have reached the ideal state – any more rights and we have tipped over into the situation where society will now begin to deteriorate?’ It may seem strange to talk about deterioration when the point of rights is to improve the position of individuals. But I think the following problems are raised by ever more rights for individuals:This is a question for us as lawyers. The number of lawyers has tripled over the last few decades, partly (but by no means only) as a result of the social engineering which has produced more rights for everyone. We have become used to the language of rights, but I wonder whether it is the correct language for the future, particularly now that rights with big financial costs are heading into the sunset. It is a question for the EU especially, which has fashioned its identity on the harmonisation of rights (the right to free movement of goods and services being the most obvious), which has often meant the introduction of new rights in the member states. What would happen to the EU if there was sudden agreement that no new rights should be introduced? And then there is the changing nature of global power. Both in the times of our own ascendance, and during the American century, we were dealing with governments which claimed that they were established on rights, and so listened – sometimes reluctantly – to arguments clothed in that language. But, as we know, arguments about rights bounce off the Chinese government without effect. I have raised many questions, and provided no answers. That is because, when you have been educated as I have in the language of rights, it is very difficult to learn a new language, and to see which way the future will unfold. But I think now is time to start thinking about it.last_img read more

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PEP soars at King & Wood Mallesons EUME

first_imgAsia-headquartered global firm King & Wood Mallesons has announced what it describes as ‘rocketing’ financial results for its Europe and Middle East (EUME) practice.  Profit per equity partner soared 39% to £610,000 on income up 7% to £191m in 2014/15.William Boss, managing partner, said: ‘This is an exciting time for our region with great success on recent panel appointments such as FSCS, One Savings Bank and the AA, which saw us advise on their £1.14bn refinancing. ‘Our strength in areas like private equity continues to be at the centre of our business and we are delighted to advise our established clients like PAI Partners on their sixth fund formation as well as UK Green Investment Bank on the world’s first dedicated offshore wind fund.’ He added: ’Furthermore our global capability continues to pay dividends with advice on matters such as South32 on its demerger from BHP Billiton and its primary listing on the Australian Securities Exchange and standard listing on the London Stock Exchange.’International firm SJ Berwin merged in 2013 with Australian-Chinese giant King & Wood Mallesons to create a firm with combined turnover of $1bn.King & Wood Mallesons EUME has made 15 partner hires over the last financial year, included a string of appointments to the Real Estate group from Eversheds.See all financial news and results here >>last_img read more

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India’s PCM Group acquires Rail.One

first_imgRAIL.ONE: Concrete sleeper and ballastless track technology supplier Rail.One has been acquired by PCM Group of Industries, an Indian conglomerate with engineering, communications, energy, steel, media, tea and other interests in India, Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Thailand and Bhutan.Financial details have not been disclosed. Announcing the deal on April 9, Rail.One said the conclusion of its search for a strategic investor was ‘an exceptionally positive signal’ which would strengthen the positions of both companies in the rail sector. ‘Together we combine Rail.One’s strengths of quality and reliability along with the broad long-term vision PCM lives throughout in the entire railway infrastructure segment’, said Rail.One CEO Jochen Riepl. ‘These competencies will result in new business possibilities and international growth for the group.’ Kamal Kumar Mittal, Chairman of PCM Group of Industries, said the ‘giant step for PCM Group’ was ‘one of the major acquisitions in the railway sector by an Indian company, making PCM Group one of the world’s largest track systems and service providers.’ Rail.One has more than 600 employees at plants in Germany, Hungary, Romania, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, Spain and Turkey, with a total annual production capacity of 4 million sleepers and more than 580 000 m of turnout bearers. It has average annual sales of approximately €130m.last_img read more

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Down Syndrome Day Recognized by National Youth Council of Dominica

first_img Share Share Tweet Share LocalNews Down Syndrome Day Recognized by National Youth Council of Dominica by: – March 22, 2019center_img Sharing is caring! 20 Views   no discussions President of the National Youth Council (NYC) of Dominica , Paul BaronPresident of the National Youth Council (NYC) of Dominica, Paul Baron says that ” Individuals who are living with Down Syndrome should be recognized for having value in society.” He made that statement in reference to World Down Syndrome Day which was celebrated Mar. 21, 2019 under the global theme, “Leave No one Behind.”Baron informed DA Vibes that the NYCD continues to educate individuals on Down Syndrome under a local theme, “Seeking to Build Inclusive Communities”. He said that victims of such condition deserve to be part of the ‘working world’ and made reference to Alister Abel who is the first Down Syndrome individual who has been integrated in the working world.Baron said that Abel was employed by Jolly’s Pharmacy and this should provide others with the confidence to also be employed.last_img read more

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Low Power Cellular IoT Module with Integrated LTE-M/NB-IoT Modem and GPS

first_imgNordic Semiconductor has announced the availability of the first nRF9160 System-in-Package (SiP) member of its nRF91 Series of cellular IoT modules via its global distribution network. This includes Digi-Key Electronics, Mouser Electronics, and Premier Farnell (amongst others).The nRF9160 has also received GCF certification – the trusted mobile communications industry ‘quality mark’ for compliance to the 3GPP LTE specification and global cellular network interoperability – along with separately required FCC and CE regulatory certifications. This means the nRF9160 SiP is approved for deployment in cellular networks and cellular IoT product applications around the world.The general availability of the nRF9160 SiP will make cellular IoT wireless technology accessible to any application due to the unique ease with which the module can be designed-in. Prime examples include asset monitoring and tracking, utility metering, industrial (machinery) connectivity and predictive maintenance, smart city and infrastructure, agrotech (smart agriculture), and medical.Measuring just 10 x 16 x 1 mm in size, the nRF9160 SiP is suitable for even compact wearable consumer and medical devices, yet is a complete solution that integrates everything a cellular connection and IoT application may need beyond requiring just an external battery, SIM, and antenna.To achieve this ultra-high integration Nordic partnered with Qorvo to make a System-in-Package that more closely resembles an integrated chip than a module. The nRF9160 SiP leverages Qorvo’s state-of-the-art, proven RF front-end, advanced packaging, and MicroShield™ technology to deliver a unique, ultra-compact solution that combines high performance with low power consumption. The nRF9160 SiP supports global operation with a single SiP variant thanks to the combination of Nordic’s multimode LTE-M / NB-IoT modem, SAW-less transceiver, and a custom RF front-end solution from Qorvo.  The nRF9160 SiP is also the first cellular IoT module to incorporate Arm’s latest Arm Cortex M-33 CPU core. It has 1MB of Flash plus 256 kB of RAM on-board memory with a broad range peripheral set, analog and digital interfaces, 32 GPIOs, a stand-alone modem with full LTE capability, plus a multiband RF front-end. The nRF9160 SiP is also the first module to incorporate Arm’s state-of-the-art Arm TrustZone and Arm CryptoCell security for Internet-level encryption and application protection. Both these technologies are designed for highly energy-efficient embedded IoT products that require the highest levels of performance in processing, power consumption, and security.Another unique feature of the nRF9160 SiP in the cellular IoT module market is integrated GPS support to allow a combination of GPS and cellular data to be used for more accurate positioning than either technology is capable of when used in isolation.The nRF9160 SiP is supported by a development kit, SiP module samples, LTE-M firmware, and an SDK with application example for cloud connectivity. This includes Nordic’s ‘nRF Connect for Cloud’ cloud-based device management tool and ‘nRF Connect for Desktop’ PC-based tool, plus support for Segger Embedded Studio. These are all designed to help give customers a flying start with sensor-to-cloud IoT applications.NB-IoT and GPS functionality is in limited sampling and will be made available for evaluation through firmware updates during Q1 2019. Click here to learn more abou the nRF9160 SiP module.last_img read more

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